Caruso Heating

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Originally Published through The Reader’s Choice – Southwest Edition

Caruso Heating was founded over two decades ago and continues to be a family-owned business at 98 McNeilly Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15226. They earned the 2017 Reader’s Choice Southwest Silver award for Best Heating and Air Conditioning.

Caruso heating has been owned by Tony Caruso for the past 25 years. According to him, their services include heating and air conditioning, air quality and humification products. They offer affordable pricing on HVAC units and installation, which includes making their prices fit within your budget.

Caruso discussed how his business follows old school values. The company is dedicated to 100% customer satisfaction. He wants his customers to know that he will tailor their services to fit within the boundaries of their budget.

“We treat and deal with every one of our customer’s on an individual basis. We try to do the job right on the first time around. We try to meet and adjust to customer’s needs on heating and cooling,” Caruso said.

The technicians that work for Caruso are NATE-certified which means that installations will be done right. They rate high with the A+ Better Business Bureau and their workers are NATE-Certified technicians.

They are currently looking to hire HVAC Field Service Technicians. If you are interested in the position, you can call 412-882-6080.

Caruso Heating offers a variety of deals on their HVAC services, including 36-months of no-interest financing and saving up to $1650 in instant rebates.

In response to what customers should know about their services, Caruso said “We are committed to integrity, customer support and product quality.”

They guarantee that customers will be satisfied with their work on the first installation.

When asked about what Caruso believes is unique about his business, he said “We treat the customer’s house and property like it’s our house. We take the same amount of care as if we are working on our own house.”

Railyard Grill and Tap Room

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Originally Published through The Reader’s Choice – Southwest Edition

Railyard Grill and Tap Room, opened in October of 2016, and is known as a New American Craft Cuisine to loyal workers and customers. They are located at 413 Railroad Street in Bridgeville, PA.

“Our goal is to put Bridgeville on the map with quality of food. You don’t have to go downtown to experience a vast beer selection and elevated food selection. We are trying to bring that downtown feel to the South Hills,” said general manager Jeremy Rob.

Railyard and Tap Room has 50 rotating taps along with locally sourced food. They carry drinks from all over the world, but they focus their taps on local Pittsburgh or Pennsylvania beers, ciders and meads. They won two Reader’s Choice awards including a Gold award for Sports Bar and Silver Award for New Restaurant, both in Southwest.

As for their food, Rob said that “Railyard Grill and Tap Room is unique because we source all our beef, pork, all the stuff we get from local farms. It is all local grass-fed and cruelty free. The fish we sell can be swimming around the warm pacific ocean waters of Hawaii one day and in our kitchen 24 hours later.”

The food found at Railyard is homemade or sourced from other nearby businesses. They like to try different dishes at the restaurant but some of their speciality food includes local grass-fed steaks and burgers and craft-beer infused wing sauces.

“Being a new business in the area, we try to partner with other local businesses. Like we use a salad dressing from a place up the street. We are trying to grow the businesses of our partners that we team up with,” said Rob.

In doing this, Railyard is hoping to increase the impact of sustainability in ingredients and food. They make sure that they are creating an environment that helps to build the communication and execution of these ideas while giving people a place to enjoy their food.

On top of the normal dining experience, Railyard also offers a large space to host events and they include a full-banquet menu. They also host a trivia night once a month.

“It’s a neighborhood gathering place where you can get elevated food and a vast beer selection in an environment where the staff is friendly and knowledgable and where people like to keep coming back,” said Rob.

You can find them on Facebook as Railyard Grill and Tap Room and on Instagram @RailyardTap. They are open seven days a week from 11 a.m. to 2 a.m.

Cenacolo

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Originally Published through The Reader’s Choice – Westmoreland Edition

Cenacolo Restaurant started as a small pasta business in Steve and Jen Salvi’s basement. They began selling pasta to Pittsburgh restaurants in 2005 and eventually the business grew into Cenacolo in 2013.

Cenacolo’s is located at 1061 Main Street in North Huntingdon, Pa 15642.  It seats over 120 people and provides a full bar to customers.

“Being in an industrial park, I like when people enter the restaurant for the first time and are taken back by the design of the restaurant” said Steve Salvi in response to what he liked the most about his restaurant.

The pasta they serve is made by them with Italy-imported machines and some of the speciality dishes include tagliolini with crab meat and ricotta gnocchi with short rib ragu.

When asked to describe his restaurant’s services, Steve Salvi said “We are strictly a fresh pasta restaurant.  It is a dining experience that should not be rushed.  From the olives to the lemoncello, it is time to sit back and relax.”

The dining experience he discusses takes about two hours and his food is only a part of it. He believes that the company people bring and his food together create a great time for his customers.

Cenacolo won three awards from Reader’s Choice, including Gold for Ethnic food and Bronze for Romantic Restaurant in Westmoreland  and Bronze for Restaurant in North Huntingdon.

“We are very grateful for the rewards given, but the only rewards we strive for are the smiles at the tables” said Steve Salvi. “I would like our customers to know how grateful we are for their support. To know that we will always strive to give you the best in food, service and experience.

The restaurant also offers pasta classes once a month, sometimes more. You can make Cenacolo favorites and then enjoy them afterwards. To reserve a spot, call 724-515-5983.

“I welcome anyone who is looking for a great pasta meal. It is a dining experience that when you are finished, you feel that it was the best meal you have had in a long time, you feel refreshed and cannot wait to come back and bring your family and friends” said Steve Salvi.

Cenacolo is open Monday through Thursday from 11:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m, Friday and Saturday from 11:30 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. and Sunday they have brunch from 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. and dinner from 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. You can make reservations by calling 724-515-5983.

 

Trib Reader’s Choice “Advertorials”

During March of 2017, Autumn had the opportunity to write “advertorials” for the Trib Total Media Reader’s Choice. She wrote about Cenacolo’s in the Westmoreland edition and about Caruso’s Heating and Railyard Grill and Tap Room in the Southwest edition. To prepare for these pieces, she conducted short interviews with the owners and did research about the businesses on their respective website

School Organizations

Autumn has worked on social media accounts for Point Park’s PRSSA Chapter and the Honors Student Organization (HSO). She ran the PRSSA’s Twitter, Facebook and Instagram for the duration of her freshman year. In her sophomore year, she covered several events for HSO by live tweeting quotes and information.

In September of 2016, she also was a content creator for the Center for Media Innovation’s (CMI) opening day. She ran the CMI’s Twitter and Snapchat while she attended events such as the Sarah Koenig lecture and other panels.

Why identifying as an intersectional feminist is important

By: Autumn Barszczowski

In the aftermath of the women’s marches, how do women expand the feminist movement?

The further we venture into Donald Trump’s presidency, the more I realize that we need to start a conversation about intersectional feminism and how to step away from mainstream feminism, or what I like to refer to as, white feminism.

What is white feminism, you ask? White feminism is what we often consider to be the main form of feminism, a movement that solves problems for all women.

This includes ideas such as equal pay, the sales tax placed upon feminine hygiene products in some states, clothing choices in the workplace and much more. While these are clearly problems that many women face, these feminists fail to realize that these problems are faced primarily by white, middle class women.

The problems women of color and transgender women face are the ones that white women tend to forget about simply because they do not affect us. We do not do it on purpose, but we are so focused on the problems we face that we forget that we are not the only ones who struggle.

For decades, many white women in the feminist movement have failed to include the problems of these women in our movement and have moved forward without them.

In the past three years, I have started to examine the problems that I have been discussing as a part of the feminist conversation. I realize now that there were times where I was not inclusive of all women in the feminist movement. I noticed my shortcomings in feminist conversations when I was introduced to the idea of intersectionality.

This term intersectionality seems obscure but is defined as “the theory that the overlap of various social identities, as race, gender, sexuality and class, contributes to the specific type of systemic oppression and discrimination experienced by an individual,” according to dictionary.com.

For example, this could refer to how a black woman is not only faced with the oppression that comes with being a woman, but also with the oppression that comes with her race.

This problem is faced by all women who are outside of the white, straight, middle class description. This could be due to their race, class or sexuality.

Whatever it may be, they are faced by the trouble of the overlap of this systematic discrimination and will not be faced with a singular set of problems.

The reason it is important to recognize the distinction between intersectional feminism and mainstream feminism is that it allows us to open the conversation about how oppression is not limited to one of your identities.

The struggles that white, straight, middle class women face are more likely to be seen and heard in the mass media, even if the problems they bring to light are not solved.

The problems faced by these women are a part of a conversation that many women of color and transgender women do not get a chance to be a part of.

I grew up in schools that constantly shed the spotlight on the ways that oppression can build up depending on your intersecting identities. It’s time that our feminism reflects on the fact that people in the world have more than one identity.

We need to support the people who are not included in this mainstream movement because we must stay united.

If we choose to ignore the problems we do not personally face, then we will never be able to move forward.

I am an intersectional feminist because I recognize that I will not struggle in the same way that other women do and they will need my support just like I will need theirs.

My problems will not be the same as theirs, but that does not mean that they do not deserve equal attention. If we stick together in this fight we can keep progressing because without unity, the next four years will be impossible to conquer.

Originally published with The Globe